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Webinar

Jan
5

Dashboard Best Practices: SEO

Your webinar host Art Grigorian welcomes TapClicks Product Marketing Director Zachary Jarvinen and Business Development Director David Lovell to talk about how you can use your marketing dashboards to improve your SEO.


This webinar covers:

  • What SEO is and how it affects your marketing
  • SEO best practices
  • Building an awesome SEO dashboard
  • Q&A
  • Learn how to use your marketing dashboards to track and improve you non-paid search traffic with this webinar.

Transcript

Art Grigorian:

Everybody, thank you so much for joining us today and Happy New Year. And also thanks for taking the time out of your day to join us. We have a great training webinar for you today on SEO best practices. My name is Art Grigorian and I’m the Director of Customer Experience here at TapClicks. We will be joined today, as you heard, Zach Jarvinen, the Product Marketing Director, which some of you are already familiar with. He’s a regular on these webinars. And Zach’s an experienced marketer and a TapClicks expert and, as always, he’ll be sharing some great insights on how to get the most out of your dashboards.
And today, we also have a special guest. David Lovell. Welcome, David. David is new to the Tap family. He’s the Director of Business Development. He brings a wealth of SEO experience to the team and he’s a former Director of SEO, with a special focus on enterprise. We’re very happy to have him here, and he was very happy to share some great insights with all of you today.
Let’s go over our quick agenda. We will be doing some housekeeping items very quickly, and then David will jump right in to give you a refresher on SEO. Zach l will provide you with some general dashboard best practices, before showing you how to build a great SEO dashboard, and we will have some time at the end to take questions.
So, for future trainings, please bookmark TapClicks.com/training. It’s very helpful for us to know ahead of time who will be joining, and it also justifies us doing more of these trainings in the future. We know how helpful you find these. We actually have another webinar coming up on the 20th of January, to cover the upcoming [inaudible 00:01:58]. So, please join us for that one. We encourage all of you to ask questions. You can do it directly from the JoinMe chat box, just click on the little chat icon and you can type it in there. We will do our best to answer everyone’s questions during the call, but if we run out of time or if you do have a specific question about your dashboard, feel free to send an email to your account manager, or you can contact our rockstar support team at support.TapClicks.com.
As always, we’ll be recording this webinar and we’ll share the recording with you some time next week along with the decks. I also encourage you to visit our knowledgebase, where we have a full library of all our previous webinars. You can use the link at the bottom. Lots of great knowledge, information in there and also articles.

Zachary Jarvinen:

We, of course, you can just find that [inaudible 00:03:01] by going to our customercare.TapClicks.com, but Art added a little diddly there, Tap Webinars, [inaudible 00:03:06] page which has them all listed out. There’s some really great ones in the past, yeah, on input wizards. Some of the things that we’ll touch on, we’ll actually be using today. Calculations. But we won’t have time to go in depth in them. So, if there’s something that piques your interest, you may want to check out there, look at that webinar or, of course, ask your account or customer care, which they can do a demo or something like that.

Art Grigorian:

Exactly. Lots of great stuff in there. Thanks, Zach. Alright, we know your time’s precious, so without further ado, David, take it away.

David Lovell:

Thank you, guys. I’m really happy to be here and I appreciate the invite. Just a little bit more background on me, I’ve been in the digital space since 2001. I started with Dex Media and was involved with the infancy of internet Yellow Pages and also local, organic and paid search. In 2009, I was recruited my a company called [inaudible 00:04:03], out of Tel Aviv, Israel, and I worked in their New York office as a Director of SEO from 2009 until just recently, when I joined the Tap team. And I’m excited to be part of such a great, growing team here.
The fellows have asked me to do a real quick overview of some of the fundamentals of SEO, for anybody who may need that information. So, I’ve agreed to do that and I’m excited to talk about some of this stuff.

Art Grigorian:

[crosstalk 00:04:30]

David Lovell:

So, what we’re looking at here is a snapshot of a search engine results page, or what many of you know as a SERP. The way I like to describe SEO to people who may not be familiar with it is sort of like this: We all have to remember that Google, Yahoo, Bing, all of these search engines, they’re businesses, right? So, just like your business, you want to deliver your clients the best, most relevant results, right? So, that’s what the search engines do. And the way that they do that is they have what they call an algorithm, and that algorithm crawls sites and includes many different factors that involve ranking specific websites-

Zachary Jarvinen:

Okay. Thanks David.

David Lovell:

Yeah, no problem. So, search engine results page or what also refer to, many people refer to, as a SERP. S E R P. So, as I mentioned before, we all have to remember that Yahoo, Bing, Google, all of the search engines, they’re businesses, right? What they’re trying to do is they’re trying to deliver the most relevant results to their clients. Because like any business, they want people to come back, because everybody’s in business to make money, right?
So, the way that they do that is with what we call an algorithm. The algorithm takes in several hundred factors that allow a site to rank what we refer to as “organically,” for specific keywords, okay? So, in this specific snapshot that you’re looking at on this page, this is a snapshot that we call above the fold, okay? And the reason that it’s being called above the fold is because that’s what you see before you have to scroll down. Specifically, what we’re looking at is a paid listing at the top.
Of course, everybody understands that this is done through a paid ad service. And then we have local organic search, which would equate to, let’s say you’re in Boston or San Jose and you’re looking for a plumber. You type in San Jose plumber, you’re going to get a list of relevant, high quality results that the search engines believe are going to be able to answer your question or search query. Everything below that is organic, okay? And that makes up the bulk amount of these search results that you’re going to see on any type of search query, whether it’s specifically keyword related or what we call long-tail keyword related.
Keyword related would be like “San Jose plumber.” Long-tail would be “San Jose drain clogged need a plumber now 24/7.” Notice the difference. So, that in a nutshell is the first step in recognizing what SEO is and what the results look like. Okay, go ahead Art, you can switch the page.
Okay, so now that we know what SEO is and in a nutshell what it looks like, why is it important? Okay. Because organic search is the largest channel for traffic. Some recent studies have shown that it makes up 51% of all search traffic. Same studies have showed that 80% of all clicks are from organic links, meaning when somebody does a search query, they a lot of times will ignored paid search and go straight for the organic search results. I know that’s how I search, and I know a lot of people do it the same way.
Another really important factor is we talked about above the fold before. Being above the fold is the most coveted spot for any business that’s trying to be competitive in SEO. Some research does show that every time you’re below the fifth position organically, you’re losing up to 15% traffic. When you’re on second and third page, in some cases, in many cases, your traffic is virtually non-existent. So, being above the fold, being on the first page, of course, as everybody knows, is extremely important.
Okay, Art. Please continue.
Great, so. Fundamental level of SEO and what it includes. I always like to describe SEO as a pie, okay? There’s a lot of ingredients that go in to this pie. Some are sweet, some are not. We have two sides of that pie. We have on site SEO and we have off site SEO. Some people are experts in on site. Some people are experts in off site. Some people are experts in all of it. It’s all important, but there are certain things that I like to call the sugar.
So, specifically, on site SEO are things like how you build your website, the architecture that you build it with. How easy is it for the search engines to crawl your website? How quickly is it loading? How good is your content on the site? Are you refreshing that content? Is it new content? Is it content that the search engines think are relevant to specific search queries. And most importantly, is the user experience good? Are the algorithms defining that experience that the user’s going to get as a positive experience? Because at the end of the day, like we mentioned before, Google, Yahoo, Bing are all businesses. They want their clients to continue to use them. They find what they’re looking for, they’re going to come back.
The second part of the pie is what we call off spite. This is probably my favorite part. This is the part that’s changing more than the on site is, specifically with link building. So, link building has been a factor for … Since the inception of SEO, but is often debated on how important it is. Since the Penguin updates starting in 2013, there’s certainly been a debate on link building. I can tell you from experience, I’m going to be happy to elaborate with anyone else on this, link building has always been important. It has changed a lot, but the most important part about building good quality links is getting in to good neighborhoods, okay?
Ten years ago, you could buy a thousand spammy links, you could repeat exact anchor text over and over again, and it would put you at the top of whatever search query you’re looking to go for. Nowadays, you have to be very, very strategic with what you’re linking to. A good example would be if you’re somebody who’s selling tennis shoes. If you have a good link on, let’s say, a fashion blog that has a good domain authority and is in a good what we refer to as “neighborhood,” that’s good for you.
If you’re on a site hosted in the Philippines that has nothing to do with fashion or shoes or sports or anything like that and you’re at the footer of the page, that’s a bad neighborhood. So, overall, on site and off site, the most important thing to remember is quality content, quality linking, making sure that your site is easy to view and easy to use and provides some sort of value to the end user.

Zachary Jarvinen:

Hey, David. Monica has a question. She wants to know, does using AdWords affect the organic rankings?

David Lovell:

Not specifically, no. Unless you mean as far as traffic going to the site from AdWords, after time, the more traffic that you do get to your site can affect the domain authority of your site and that, of course, is a positive, but initially, no.

Zachary Jarvinen:

I was going to say the same, nice one, precisely right, David. Nice. Indirectly.

David Lovell:

Great. Anything else?

Art Grigorian:

That’s all for now.

David Lovell:

Great. Thank you.

Zachary Jarvinen:

Thank you, David. Cool, we’re going to pivot in to, we had, in fact, reached on that last point, just adding to the [inaudible 00:13:50]. And this is what’s really neat about pivoting in to dashboards and visualizing these things. It’s totally true, actually, SEM doesn’t have a direct link, but you’ll see, if you do have that turned up, a slight bump in SEO over time that you could … Again, it’s always tough to attribute exactly, but you can see that slight bump, it’s because exactly what David said, that there’s some just, having more traffic helps your domain authority and in turn can affect your SEO.
So, we’re going to talk about first, general dashboard best practices here, and then we’re going to pivot in to building a great SEO dashboard. How do we get those visualizations? How do we see that and then, in terms, be better with our SEO?
So, in a similar vein, we’ll start with a little refresher here. What’s neat about, Art, you want to flip the slide? So, in general, for dashboard building, we want to build visualizations that align with how humans see and process variations in data. What does that mean? So, what’s really cool, actually is we’re, as soon as we’re hard-wired to notice variations in trends, right? That’s what makes these dashboards great. Rather than a bunch of ones and zeroes, we can bring our data or our performance to life with trends and indicators, matching them with great visualizations.
With that, though, it is important overarchingly to keep in mind, focus on … What you want to do is bring the data or data variation to life. So that we see the trends, so that we see what’s going on, that’s determined using the dashboard building five second test. If you can’t tell within three, four or five seconds what’s going on, then you’re not doing it right. So, always focus on data over design. Use the design to support the data.
If folks don’t know of Edward Tufte, he’s like, the early pioneer in data visualization. He’s the guy who invented spark lines and folks, or data geeks that use spark lines and he’s got a really cool book out on this, it’s Visual Display of Quantitative Information, which Amazon called best hundred books of the 20th century, or another geek point, a visual Strunk and White. So, if somebody [inaudible 00:16:04] from college and was a writer and used the Shrunk and White, Tufte is the visual Strunk and White guy.
Moving on. Yeah. So just, again, really quick here, how do we build great dashboards? Again. The other way you do that is focus on the audience. Who are you speaking to? Who does the dashboard speak to? So, on the right hand side of the spectrum, you’ve got the C-Suites. For them, really, it’s, often it’s … Some of the KPIs. Are we up? Are we down? And then specific KPIs, what’s going on there?
And then, as you go to the left, the need for access or the need for additional data becomes broader. So, you have VPs and Directors, a little more tactical as they’re overseeing it, maybe overseeing the managers and such. Of course, your campaign managers really are looking at their campaigns. Are they optimizing those, what do they need to do that? And then on down to the, whether it’s a Data Analyst, if you’re fortunate to have that, or even just other folks on the team members that, if they want to dive in, they make changes, they want to be … See the context of data so that the changes that they’re making are not causing other problems, but helping everything. So, how do we build that? How do we build a dashboard that actually achieves all that? It’s kind of a big challenge.
Next slide.
So, one of … The way we attempt to do it and again, this is … It’s always a work in progress, it’s a new journey we’re on, but indicators up top, so, and we’ll see that in our SEO dashboards, this is so the VPs, Directors, C-Suites, whoever, can see, immediately, those KPIs that are really important to them and how they’re performing and then decide “Hey, do I go down the page or not?”
Trends next, okay, based on those KPIs, what’s causing them, or what’s moving, are some things up, are some things down, is there some sort of aberration in the data or some sort of trend that we want to address? And then finally, the details. That’s where you’ll get that full context. If you’re making changes, you want to get that full context there, so you’re not causing other problems as you make changes.
Cool? Alright.
So, building a great SEO dashboards. So, if folks have their instance open, they’re welcome to join along and build along with us. As Art said, we’ll also send this out afterwards if you want to use this as a working session, or that video as a way to build it. I don’t know if we’ll have time for a live demo today, but we’ll go through it, hopefully it’s really clear and like we’re doing here, type in your questions if you have questions and we’ll just take them along the way or at the end.
Cool. So, starting with the [inaudible 00:18:45], I think it’s cool because it does take some work to do a dashboard, so it’s cool to see, hey, at the end of the day, what should this look like? So, again, the indicators up top, I personally like using the cost per visit, organic search. We’ll talk about how to build, how to actually make that calculation. But in my shop, we’re very focused on visits and conversions. So, those are the ones there. There’s some other ways you can do that, we’ll see that later slide, but then just piggybacking on what we just said, the next visual representation of trends, so we see lines and bars, again, we’ll go through this deeply. Next slide.
And then finally, we round it out with those grids with the more detailed views. That can be achieved here on our custom dashboards with these, what we call top performance widgets, or, of course, we’re really, really deep with our data, you can drill in to services and focus … [inaudible 00:19:46] Can confirm that we have more metrics than anyone else. We have more services, more marketing services and more marketing metrics. So, if you don’t apparently see it, it’s because you haven’t built it or you haven’t drilled in to it, so we’ll look at that a little bit today.
So, yeah. So, even before we go to that kind of custom dashboard, elite dashboard that we want to build or we were just showing. It’s important to … TapClicks works just out of the box, and we probably do have some pro users on the call, using what’s called prebuilt dashboards. Namely, services overview and categories overview. So, what those do, it’s the same thing that you’ve probably seen when you were setting a dashboard or it’s often many people’s default page. It’s on the left there, that services overview. So, if you were thinking …
If you want to really think about, or use this for SEO reporting or visualization, you can actually use that. So, the way I did is I duplicated a default profile, so, again, if these are advanced topics, we can talk about them at the end or we’ll refer back to the webinar we did specifically on reporting profiles. But reporting profiles is how you manage your data pipes within TapClicks, and so you can clone a reporting profile, that’s actually what I did, specifically for Search Engine Optimization, and then within that reporting profile, I’m making tweaks so I can actually give my SEO analyst a specific reporting profile for them, where they can only see the things that they want to be working on. Namely, here, the tools that are related SEO, so Google WebMaster, Moz, [inaudible 00:21:29] Analytics with some filters on … Ah, good question … On organic search, in addition to the others.
We do have a set of others, including the one that I think we just saw in the chat, we do the import templates, we have these templates to get the data in. So, next one? Cool.
In addition to this, we have a predefined SEO category, so another really cool thing with TapClicks is we … What you don’t want to do is, [inaudible 00:22:03] fun thing, is don’t data puke. Do not data puke on me. So, you’ve always got to find the right level of data to give the … To, okay, pass the five second test, so we can give the right people the right data to make decisions based off of that or make changes. And so one of the cool things that, in general, helps us with that, as well as a lot of people use it if you sell packages, if you’re an agency that sells packages, are category views, right? You can roll up your data, just like in the services overview, into a whole category and report and visualize based off of that.
So, we do have one out of the box for SEO, it’s got boost ability as well, in there. In addition, you may want to build your own. What I did is build my own based off of that, using an imported template of the one that was just mentioned in the chat, and so I had a fairly robust SEO … Additionally to that, there’s one other benefit, which is then I can set metrics, or as I can conjoin metrics across those services in to category calculations.
So if you’re … I know it’s small, but if you’re looking at domain authority, I may just pull that from Moz, or if there’s two services that offer that, I can calculate an average between the two. Site visits, I may just pull it from [inaudible 00:23:23] or I may pull it from somewhere else, that’s the powerful things that one can do with these categories. Cool.
So, what does that look like just in terms of the categories overview page? You can see there, we’ve just like, again, [inaudible 00:23:42] dashboard, just like the services overview, you click in to it and you see your category. Here, I’m listing both. You may want to hide that SEO default category and just show the categories you’re actively using and so, again, you can hide all of them but SEO, you can use it, of course, alongside your other category reporting there, but really neat.
How do you change and optimize categories using reporting profiles? Again, you want to loop back to that webinar we did specifically on reporting profiles, but what’s good is it’s really the same process that focuses on reporting profiles. It’s super easy. Just click in to the reporting profiles you’re seeing on the right hand of this screen. Click on the dashboard metrics, those are those that show up there, directly on that categories page. And then also, you’ll want to select, going there, top metrics. The top metrics are the ones that, once you drill in to the view, show at the top of these kind of more detailed views.
Finally, right, again, we take all the metrics [inaudible 00:24:48] that’s our goal. We love that, because we want you guys to be able to do crazy, cool stuff with it, right? So, from there you can then decide what detailed metrics show in that grid below by simply pulling them from the inactive to active columns, which is that screen on the right. You pull it in to the active column and they will show there and you’ll get the exact metrics you want in the order you want them.
Carrying on, if any questions, type them in, if we can take some of them now, if not, we’ll take them at the end, but awesome. So, next, so that’s how to do great SEO reporting right out of the box, as a pro user of TapClicks. Now, a lot of folks on the line are already being elite with our most popular package. It’s awesome. It’s crazy, I think it’s [inaudible 00:25:36] most for what I do. And it just adds additional customization ability to build these great dashboards.
So, for it, let’s go step by step. What we’re going to do now is go step by step through that dashboard I showed at the beginning. The first thing is actually really neat, it’s really the same extension of what you did for your reporting profile for SEO, which is pick the top KPIs, right? So, that’s what we’re seeing here at the top of the page. These are the top of the custom dashboard, if you’re looking within your dashboard now, you’ll want to name it, just search engine optimization, something like that. Or of course, these could be added to another dashboard that you already have, if you want to have a section of this dashboard which talks about SEO.
What you’re doing here is you’re picking big numbers, AKA, KPIs, right? AKA sometimes the same that you picked for dashboard or top metrics, and really starting out with those. So your executives, so yourself sometimes, so your team members can see hey, how we’re doing on these KPIs. Now, what did I do here, for me? Process, I actually, again, we’re really about focused, deep down [inaudible 00:26:42] on results. I did visits, conversions, cost per visit and cost per conversion.
Now, how do you do that? So, right, it’s … Unlike advertising, where you’re paying for click opt-ins, often you have somebody exceptional, somebody on David Lovell’s team or ex-team that’s doing the work for you. That person, then, has some sort of cost associated. So what I’ve done here, actually, is use our calculations to just insert a new metric that is for the fixed-cost salary of that person or their man-hours if you do it by hours, times the time period and then dividing it sessions over that, I get a cost per visit.
For me, this is super helpful, right? Maybe you’re talking to a client or you’re talking to an executive in the organization, right? They’re like “Oh, this SEO thing, how do we make it work?” Or “It’s just free, right?” Well, if you can associate a cost to it, then you can also help with … Talk to your [inaudible 00:27:42] service about “Hey, look at the return we’re getting from SEO. We maybe should spend some more time on link building or what have you. From a cost per conversion basis, it’s less than our other channels. AdWords, what have you.” So, it helps you really facilitate those great conversations.
Alternatively, of course, a little more traditional SEO metrics. The domain authority that David mentioned earlier, your total number of links, right? These are super important, if you want to ultimately have more impressions, more clicks, better search engine result performance, you’re really talking about upping those things and so those are some other ones you may consider. You can obviously do a combination of the two. I, personally, love … It’s tough, but I’m like, this is what we need to do. This is limit myself to four.
Now, eight is fine, come on. But it’s that process that helps you decide, it’s actually the same process as building the dashboard is the process you use to boil down to what are your real KPIs at the end of the day, for SEO? You’ll have additional ones in details, additional ones in trends, but here, you want to just show, what are those top ones? So, I like four one-by-ones, if you’re looking and resizing these widgets, one by one. You can actually fit two very nicely on one-by-one, so, by all means. Or you can use a one-by-four and have them all there on one line. I like the one-by-ones because it gives me … It makes it easy for me to move them later, if I want to. And again, I like the four. One per one-by-one, as much as [inaudible 00:29:20] quite alright.
Cool, so, now, immediately, this is what’s kind of neat, even those, you can tell … Let me step back. I always use comparisons for these. That is, I almost, well, you can definitely, just for a quarter, look at those numbers, and if you have the reference point in mind and work with this all the time, you know 2.35 is a lot or a little. Really, what you want to be doing is always using, or, often, using our comparisons, which is super simple, right? Top left, you see that date picker? Simply by doing that and compare to previous regions, you’re immediately seeing the up or down lift of each of these.
Make it a time period that’s [inaudible 00:30:01]. For me, I really like, I think month end or … Depends on how much reporting they want. For SEO, I like monthly, just because there can be moving parts and so it’s a nice period. Especially if you’re not working actively on it. If you were actively working on it, what I do is every seven days, and I’ll look at it even more often than that, but definitely reporting with the folks that are actively working on it, seven by seven. So, if we want to recognize early good things or bad things and take action based off of them, the end of the month will just be a culmination of the seven days.
So, that’s kind of the end of that. Now, next, right, there’s your KPIs. We settle on those, we have really great ones for reporting, we chose either lower down [inaudible 00:30:49] or different SEO ones, whichever ones you guys think are really great. Work with, your team resonates with, or your advertisers or your clients resonate with. Then next is the trims. So, check it out, we can actually see, there is actually a story to be told, even within this data. So, bars and lines are great for that, to see these changes or trends in data.
Who knows what that line chart is showing me? So, folks on the call should totally, immediately recognize “Oh yeah, we have the same thing.” Or “We don’t because we’re a B2C.” So, if you’re a B2B, you know this very well. Some B2Cs have the same effect, but we’re seeing a Monday through Friday trend, right? You see it goes up for five days, and then it goes down for two, a-ha, that is what it is.
Oh, wait a minute, there’s a couple weird things with the data. What happened on December 14th, right? So, that’s what this line chart can show. I saw this and I went “Oh man, what’s going on here?” I figured it out as an issue with Google Analytics not reporting some things, so I’m going to address that and finally, wait a minute, there’s some weird thing going on right between the Monday through Friday trends later in December. What is that? The holidays.
I love data, right? It’s like, you can feed people’s behavior, of course, December 24th, they’re not shopping for this that or the other. So it’s kind of cool to see that. It’s a funny story, but the purpose is, that’s what you want out of this kind of line chart. You want to be able to see, hey, am I on track? Am I trending up? Am I trending down? Is there anything I need to address?
That’s what you’re also seeing in the bar charts. So, there’s a general trend up. That is a good thing. Down for the holidays, so, maybe I’m okay with that, though I want to make … If there’s not a bounce back in January, I’m going to be really concerned. And then from there, what I did was use the date override and so, if folks don’t know, that’s that calendar icon in the top right. Essentially, what we’re often going to do is, man, okay, great, I’m trending up for a handful of weeks, but how many over the last quarter, or over the last year? Am I really trending up to where I was before? Keep me honest. And that’s what you can do with the date override there. I’m using last quarter, week over week. I may want to expand that more. Et cetera.
So, I’m … Cool. Find other really cool visualizations to show trends, the funnel, awesome. Sessions, conversions, there. Pretty straightforward. You can also go upstream in the funnel, hey, how many appearances in search results or how many clicks from that lead to sessions? Just kind of helps you visualize and, well, I need to attack more appearances in search results, by which I’ll get more sessions, by which I’ll get more goal completions or … That kind of help you think about attacking a certain area of the funnel, and how much you have to gain by attacking each area.
Next, on the gauge side, cool to set goals. So, actually, we’re doing a really neat thing here, which is kind of goals and pacing, using that gauge chart. So, here, I’ve picked a goal for the month. 100 conversions from SEO, and what I’m showing there is … Right on, Jeremy. A trend against that goal, right? 80 conversions. We’ve achieved 80 out of 100, a little ways left to go, maybe next … Give me something to celebrate as a team, if we achieve that. Of course, once we achieve 100, we may want to bump it up to 125, what have you, but it’s really nice to … As you’re thinking about making changes and celebrating your wins.
Finally there, cool to show like, man, what’s contributing to clicks to my sites? And so, I have a little pie chart that shows some of those top things. And we can go to the next one.
There is some limitations, again. That’s why, ultimately, at the end of the day, if you’re actually making change, if you’re actually doing the work in SEO, you want to often go back to top performers, or even those kind of detailed service-level views, because you want to see the full picture and so, here I’m showing a breakdown of key words by clicks, but not just by clicks, which is what would show in that pie chart, but also seeing it within the context of impressions, CTR and position. So, how do we, right, how do we do it?
What did David say? Top of the fold. First page. Things like that. So, if I’m looking for some quick gains, I’m going to be looking at that position. I’m going to be like “Man, we’re in 11th? That’s not too much to get to 9th. Let’s do some link building, some blogs, some content, something about that to push us over the fold, we’ll have a lot more to gain.” Well, the same thing if we’re approaching the top of the page. So, pretty neat. Any questions, let us know.
On the right hand side, you remember hearing Zach’s comment earlier. You can pull in some other data. We don’t … There’s data like … So, for SEO, some people think [inaudible 00:36:03] are important, other people, no, I actually don’t use it myself, so often, but if you are gung ho about things like linking, of course, though we don’t condone it, Google’s not really happy about it, but we do … There’s ways to get that in to our platform via Import Wizard and whatnot. Again, not condoned, but you guys have an Import Wizard, it can be used for stuff like that if that’s really important to your SEO reporting, check it out.
Cool. Yeah. Going for a while here, so we should start to wrap up. I know we’ve got a lot of questions here, so we’ll take that at the end. But this is kind of bringing us full circle, back a couple slides here. In addition to those top performers, you want your campaign managers, obviously, they have the ability to drill specifically in to those services really deep, so you may at the end of the day back off of those elite dashboards and back in to your specific services. See your Google Webmaster tools in even more context.
And once you’ve done all that work, some final things, right? So we it is a little bit of a work to set up a dashboard. It’s not so much once you get the hang of it, but do you want to set up a thousand dashboards? Probably not. And that’s what’s actually really cool about TapClick that really, few others or maybe no one else can do. You definitely can’t do this, in general bad dashboard providers, you would have to set up a thousand dashboards and who wants to do that, right?
So, you set up this awesome SEO dashboard. Now, you can do two things. One, you can drill in to your data based on client. So, within that same view that you just spent a long time getting right, you can drill in with the click of a button there in the top right and see “Okay, how is this one client performing?” And then you can, and it’s often the same where you want that … A similar view for them, often, you want to be able to drill in and then drill back out, as an organization, how’re we doing? As a client, how’re we doing?
And then, in addition to that, client groups. Maybe how are the categories performing? Or client group. If you have your clients set up in a group for a certain sales manager or ops manager, what’s the important performance based on them? Maybe they’re looking at your VIPs or there’s been some under-performance you want to look at. This is where you do it. Or, as I was saying, even cooler, you can do a category view and how auto-measures apply, and across the board. So, you do have the client groups, as well, this kind of drill in, pop out feature in the top right.
And of course, right, because of what I was saying, you want to schedule these things, right? One of the huge benefits of TapClick is you want to augment your reporting, right? We didn’t get in to doing this to be reporting all day long. Of course, some of it is important and looking at it is important, but of course you want to use that, jump in to the reporting part of the dashboard and set up some scheduled reports based off of this.
Alright. So, I think with that, we’re going to take some questions. [inaudible 00:39:05]?

David Lovell:

Zach, not sure if we have time to go over this demo, but Monica was asking about bringing in data using Import Wizard and how the automation process works. There’s, Monica, there’s, depending on what type of data you’re bringing in, we have some time to do a quick overview of that Import Wizard, or …

No, I … For Import Wizard, we can totally … It’s definitely, Art, if you want to copy in the specific webinar that we did on Import Wizard. That goes deep, step by step through it. It’s super helpful. You could even not … You want to do it, you can even pull it up and go through the steps with the Import Wizard while you’re watching that video, if there’s things that are unclear. In addition, we have these really neat templates.
So, Art actually went “[inaudible 00:39:54] You’ve added these awesome templates.” Right, if you guys go to the Import Wizard section of the dashboard, you scroll over … Is there a list of the templates?

Art Grigorian:

Yeah, there’s a button called Connection Guide, which has templates for specific services. I know somebody asked about Covario, they’re all in there. Import Wizard pretty much allows you to bring in any type of data, and then you can automate so that way you don’t have to, Jeremy was asking, you don’t have to do it every day. You just store the file, in either Google Drive, Dropbox, or you can also do a manual upload. So, there is a variety of ways to bring in your data. So, if you have data, we can definitely bring it in, no matter what type of data it is. So there’s no limitation there.

Zachary Jarvinen:

Awesome. Alright.

Art Grigorian:

Any other questions?

Zachary Jarvinen:

Yeah. Other questions, you want to type them in? I know we want to free up time for folks to go, it’s always good to give you ten minutes back if we can. If there’s any other questions, type them in and then we’ll take two seconds, we’ll go over two advanced topics that we talked about that I promised, I said I would.
One, what is that calculations thing? How do we do those calculations? Cool. So, to be able to show, as we get cost per visit or cost per conversion, the way you want to do that is using our calculations feature. Here’s a picture of it. Bottom left, in under Admin, click on Calculations, then it will pop up the ability to add a new calculation. You can set a fixed cost there, type it in the little calculator there, if you’re looking at it now. Whatever numbers you’re spending.
Again, if you have a head count, then it’s their salary. If you have somebody per hour, use that. Or if there’s a [inaudible 00:42:00] billing period you used, use that and then modify it every time. You can absolutely do that. So, plot that in and then once you’ve done that, you add a separate calculation. Here it is, here’s a great example of that. See the little calculator there? Drilling in to the calculations, you’ll see the little calculator thing there. Add that fixed cost, and then you’ll want to do another calculation where you use that metric that you just created. Cost of SEO, divided by your sessions. Then, you’re getting cost per session, or another one. Cost of SEO divided by converted them, for getting your cost per conversions.
Now, adding to this, we do other super powerful things. We have a total separate webinar just on calculations and whatnot, but just kind of giving you a peek, especially for those folks who already know that. Gauges, similar thing. This is how you do it here. How many conversions is my goal? Add it here. Just type it in to that as the keep at. 100, for instance. Update, call it “conversions goal.” And then when you’re building your gauge chart, you can do SEO conversions, pacing against goal. You add two metrics, right? The gauge is your goal and how you’re pacing against it.
So, in this case, conversions against SEO using typical analytics, metrics, goal completions, AKA conversions. You can actually rename it, using conversion calculations as well, to conversions. If you’re like “Dude, what’s goal completions? I’m sick of this term.” But this is how you would do it.
Ah, finally, right? Another super cool thing. We’re talking about organic search, so how do we boil down … How do we know that it’s just conversions from SEO or conversions or visits from SEO? We use our filter. So, at the bottom of the edit widget, we just filter data by default channel grouping, include organic search. Folks who know how to, are really analytics pros know that there’s a few other ways, but that’s a great, simple way to sort just for organic search.

Art Grigorian:

Yeah, Chris had a question. He’s not able to find the SEO section under categories. Is that because he’s maybe on a different … Not a pro?

Zachary Jarvinen:

It would be if he’s connected. It would only show it, so, first of all, he should have his categories overview turned on. I know that’s an option to turn off or on. Some people want to … We give folks a lot of configurability and flexibility there. So, if you’re a dashboard creator, you should be able to find it within preferences, the ability enable or disable categories overview. If you are like, an [inaudible 00:44:34] agent or something like that, then you’ll want to talk with your super admin or dashboard creator to get that turned on for you, and then you’ll see it.
Now, how do you see it? The additional, again, it won’t show up unless you have data in the SEO category. So, again, you should have connected Google Analytics or one of the other kind of SEO related, Moz, et cetera. And then it will show up. We try to do everyone a service of, if there’s no data, you don’t want a big thing that says SEO there. So, those two things should solve it.

Art Grigorian:

Great. Any other questions? Alright, we’re going to start to wrap this thing up. Thank you, Zach and David, this is great stuff. This wraps up our webinar. I want to thank everyone for taking the time out of their day to join us today. As mentioned earlier, we will be sending out a recording of this webinar along with a deck some time next week. We do have a webinar coming up on the 20th, so make sure to visit TapClicks.com/training to register and as we’re talking about … Hey, alright, we’ve got some funny SEO memes.
And we’re talking about the interactive guides and templates. Throughout your dashboard, you can see the buttons that say “Guide me” or “More info,” they’re in there, they’re very interactive, some of them will actually have an interactive guide to help you do certain things, like bringing in data and you can also click on the question mark in the top left of your dashboard, which will bring up a help menu, which allows you to view videos. It can also search our whole knowledge base directly from there.
So, it should be your go-to spot for any questions you may have. And as always, if you have further questions, you can always email your account manager or our support team at [email protected] Again, thank you so much for joining and you guys have a great rest of the day thank you.

Zachary Jarvinen:

Thanks guys.

David Lovell:

Thanks guys.

Zachary Jarvinen:

And let’s thank David again.

Art Grigorian:

Yeah.

David Lovell:

Thanks, Zach. Thank you, Art. Have a great day.

Art Grigorian:

You too.

 

Speakers:

Art Grigorian

Art Grigorian

Director, Customer Experience and Care

Art brings over 10 years of experience in customer support and user experience to TapClicks. He spent the past decade working at high-growth start ups establishing scalable processes and leveraging user feedback to improve customer experience.
Zachary Jarvinen

Zachary Jarvinen

Director, Product Marketing

Zachary brings over ten years experience using data-driven analysis, "growth-hacking" techniques, and product marketing execution for both startups and Global Fortune 500 companies. Most famously, he was a part of the digital team credited for electing the President in 2008.
David Lovell

David Lovell

Director of Business Development

Webinar Length

47 Min